The-Evolution-of-Data-Center-Equipment

The Evolution of Data Center Equipment

Servers and other critical data center equipment will continue to become faster, more energy-efficient and generally more viable for long-term use. With a new tiering system, organizations will be able to choose applications without worrying about RAID configurations or allocation to a specific storage level, according to InfoWorld contributor Dick Benton. The cloud has also influenced configurable storage features. With this, users can better automate recurring processes to improve efficiency.

The evolution of Data Center Equipment over the years has influenced the current design and function of equipment currently used in data centers. Blade computing, for example, provided a model for designers to use computer resources as separate blocks to meet specific needs, according to Quocirca co-founder Clive Longbottom. However, with virtualization, more data centers are honing in on building their computing capability.

Where to go from here?

As technology advances and data center equipment becomes smaller, it follows that the hardware will evolve to include all necessary components while being more energy efficient.

For example, some data centers have workload management software to ensure distribution to the correct platforms and have become more self-contained, according to Longbottom. Since just about all workloads are different, guaranteeing that it’s run on the correct platform will ensure optimal performance.

Data centers have also recently become more interested in server chips as there are changes happening that could overthrow Intel as a market leader. Intel recently announced their token Moore’s Law of exponentially expanding chip transistors would soon be coming to an end, creating a drive for new chip technology. Mobile devices have changed the game for total cost of ownership by negating fastest processors as the main objective to focus on, according to VentureBeat contributor Andi Gutmans. Workloads now serve millions of mobile devices, making power consumption and cooling processes larger factors in data center management. With the potential fading of Intel, other players like ARM Holdings have emerged to grasp a larger market share and get a foothold for future success as the industry advances.

“As long as they execute well and do not let ARM beat them on price/performance, the strong x86-based ecosystem continues to give Intel an advantage,” Gutmans wrote. “But given the surprising performance we saw out of ARM, the changes in data center economics and with players such as IBM still able to surprise, the next few years in the datacenter will be quite exciting.”

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