This Week in Tech: Data Center Management and IT News

If you felt cold this week, you’re not alone – on December 10, a NASA satellite discovered in Antarctica what would be the lowest temperature ever recorded, at 135.8 degrees below zero. In the data center management and IT world, the news is decidedly more hospitable. A variety of interesting stories, from network innovations to dealing with devices, will be part of our coverage this week. Let’s take a look:

Internet of Things to Hit 26 Billion Units by 2020
According to recent Gartner research, the Internet of Things (IoT) is projected to rise to 26 billion connected units by 2020. This represents a whopping 30-fold increase from the 900 million recorded in 2009 and indicates that IoT will be a dominant presence in IT over the next few years. Revenues stemming from the IoT market are forecasted to surpass $300 billion, with services the driving force of growth. The IoT, which accounts for a network of physical devices with the ability to communicate, does not include conventional technologies such as smartphones, tablets and PCs.

One data center management consideration will be to what degree these devices are actually activated for network use – the low cost of adding connectivity will likely mean that many devices will have the capacity to communicate but will require software in order to be actively leveraged.

65 Percent of Businesses State BYOD is a Security Threat
Data center management strategists have been among those that deal with the two phenomena that have accompanied the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) movement since its rise – concerns about its effect on enterprise security and a lack of initiatives that can adequately control it. According to a survey by Kaspersky Lab, 65 percent of businesses see BYOD as a threat to enterprise protection.

The survey, which compiled responses from more than 2,800 interviews with company representatives in 24 countries, found that 25 percent of companies currently or are planning to impose restrictions on device use in 2013. This development is encouraging, as it represents a 6 percent rise from the 19 percent of companies that restricted BYOD use in 2012. BYOD governance continued to be an issue some companies felt they could not sufficiently curtail, with 34 percent indicating that they believed employees would use their own devices despite efforts to stop them.

Antarctica Now Has a Cellular Network
Frigid temperatures weren’t the only thing happening in Antarctica this week. Australia recently constructed a cellular network in its Antarctic territorial claim, GigaOM reported. The Antarctic division of the Australian Department of the Environment partnered with Range Networks to build an independent and self-contained communications network in which calls are switched and managed onsite. Initially, the system can support 400 mobile phones and 800 landlines. The GSM network’s first station is on Macquarie Island, which is about halfway between Antarctica and Australia, and although it requires satellites to connect to the rest of the world, it could create a grid for incorporation with other research stations and facilitate better real-time connection with Earth’s southern-most continent.

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